Flourishing: Why We Need Religion in a Globalized World

January 11, 2016
Miroslav Volf’s new book, Flourishing, was released in the U.S. on January 12, 2015 through Yale University Press. Read what others have been saying about this important work below, and don’t miss the book’s starred review in Publishers Weekly.
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Greg Forster, “Why Do We Need Religion?

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Reviews of Flourishing: Why We Need Religion in a Globalized World

 
The contemporary globalized world offers a bewildering scene:  horrifying acts of religious hatred and cruelty exist alongside zones where people of different religions live in unprecedented mutual respect, even friendly exchange. Digging deep into the sources of his own, Christian faith, Volf offers an insightful and penetrating answer to both these questions.
 
—Charles Taylor, McGill University
 
 
Volf convincingly tackles one of the most important issues of the twenty-first century: how we can have a peaceful religious pluralism together with healthy globalisation. He not only gives the facts and analyses the situation perceptively, he also has the depth of understanding of a range of religions to produce a practical way forward that is both realistic and attractive.
 
—David F. Ford, University of Cambridge
 
 
Miroslav Volf’s prophetic voice brings a new perspective to the question of what it means to live the good life in a world shaped by globalization.
 
— John J. DeGioia, Georgetown University
 
 
In Flourishing, Miroslav Volf offers us an enthralling analysis of the mutual interplay between globalization and the world’s great religions, along with an inspiring vision of how great faiths can be enlarged rather than threatened by diversity. An outstanding and timely work by one of the great theologians of our time.
 
—Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks
 
 
Volf brilliantly weaves several strands of argument into an ambitious brief for the positive functions of religion in today’s global village, where the negative consequences of religion are too often written in the blood of innocents.
 
—Publishers Weekly (starred review)