3.13.1998

A Passion for God's Reign

Theology, Christian Learning, and the Christian Self

Miroslav Volf

,

Jürgen Moltmann

,

Nicholas Wolterstorff

,

Ellen T. Charry

,

3.13.1998

A Passion for God's Reign

Theology, Christian Learning, and the Christian Self

Jürgen Moltmann, Nicholas Wolterstorff & Ellen T. Charry

Heading
3.13.1998

A Passion for God's Reign

Theology, Christian Learning, and the Christian Self

Theology, Christian Learning, and the Christian Self

Miroslav Volf

,

Jürgen Moltmann

,

Nicholas Wolterstorff

,

Ellen T. Charry

,

Heading
3.13.1998

A Passion for God's Reign

Theology, Christian Learning, and the Christian Self

Miroslav Volf

,

Jürgen Moltmann

,

Nicholas Wolterstorff

,

Ellen T. Charry

,

Heading
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episode notes

In the challenging dialogue of this book, three of today's most respected Christian thinkers explore the role of theology, the task of Christian learning, and the meaning of the self in our contemporary Western society. Jürgen Moltmann builds a case for the "public" nature of Christian theology and explores how expressions of faith from both the church and the academy relate to significant aspects of modernity. Responses by Nicholas Wolsterstorff and Ellen T. Charry provide a provocative engagement with Moltmann's views.

Reviews

"A fascinating analysis of Christian theology as it takes on the task of a public theology and confronts modernity and its crises. Moltmann breaks new ground, beyond his previous writings, in his carefully crafted explorations of the relation between history and nature and between the human self and society. The responses by Wolterstorff and Charry are significant contributions in their own right. This volume is highly recommended, and its diversity of viewpoints makes it an outstanding text for discussion groups and classes."

—Francis Schüssler Fiorenza, Harvard Divinity School

"How does Christian discourse fit in the curriculum of the secular university? Has Christianity resources for restoring modern humanity to personhood? In a fascinating and light-shedding dialogue, Moltmann and two distinguished critics present sharply contrasting answers to these questions. Seldom does one find so much to chew on in 112 pages."

—Robert C. Roberts, Wheaton College

Miroslav Volf
Founder & Director, Yale Center for Faith & Culture
Nicholas Wolterstorff
Noah Porter Professor Emeritus of Philosophical Theology, Yale Divinity School
Ellen T. Charry
Margaret W. Harmon Professor of Systematic Theology Emerita, Princeton Theological Seminary

In the challenging dialogue of this book, three of today's most respected Christian thinkers explore the role of theology, the task of Christian learning, and the meaning of the self in our contemporary Western society.

In the challenging dialogue of this book, three of today's most respected Christian thinkers explore the role of theology, the task of Christian learning, and the meaning of the self in our contemporary Western society. Jürgen Moltmann builds a case for the "public" nature of Christian theology and explores how expressions of faith from both the church and the academy relate to significant aspects of modernity. Responses by Nicholas Wolsterstorff and Ellen T. Charry provide a provocative engagement with Moltmann's views.

Reviews

"A fascinating analysis of Christian theology as it takes on the task of a public theology and confronts modernity and its crises. Moltmann breaks new ground, beyond his previous writings, in his carefully crafted explorations of the relation between history and nature and between the human self and society. The responses by Wolterstorff and Charry are significant contributions in their own right. This volume is highly recommended, and its diversity of viewpoints makes it an outstanding text for discussion groups and classes."

—Francis Schüssler Fiorenza, Harvard Divinity School

"How does Christian discourse fit in the curriculum of the secular university? Has Christianity resources for restoring modern humanity to personhood? In a fascinating and light-shedding dialogue, Moltmann and two distinguished critics present sharply contrasting answers to these questions. Seldom does one find so much to chew on in 112 pages."

—Robert C. Roberts, Wheaton College

Miroslav Volf
Founder & Director, Yale Center for Faith & Culture
Nicholas Wolterstorff
Noah Porter Professor Emeritus of Philosophical Theology, Yale Divinity School
Ellen T. Charry
Margaret W. Harmon Professor of Systematic Theology Emerita, Princeton Theological Seminary

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