Episode Art: Evan Rosa
Episode Art: Evan Rosa
10.23.2021

Musical Spiritual Hotel

Rest, Hospitality, and Sacred Music

Julian Reid

,

Matthew Croasmun

,

Rest note, worn page
Episode Art: Evan Rosa
Episode No. 90
10.23.2021

Musical Spiritual Hotel

Rest, Hospitality, and Sacred Music

Julian Reid
Heading
10.23.2021

Musical Spiritual Hotel

Rest, Hospitality, and Sacred Music

Rest, Hospitality, and Sacred Music

Julian Reid
,
Matthew Croasmun
,
Heading
Episode Art: Evan Rosa
Episode Art: Evan Rosa
10.23.2021

Musical Spiritual Hotel

Rest, Hospitality, and Sacred Music

Julian Reid
,
Matthew Croasmun
,
Heading
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episode notes

Julian Reid explores the way music and scripture can come together to create a sacred space. Extending metaphors of music as architecture and dwelling and spiritual experience as a river, the jazz pianist, producer, writer, and performer explains a recent project of his, "Notes of Rest," combining African-American spirituals with classical hymns for an experience of spiritual hospitality, gratitude, and proclamation of the Gospel into the full spectrum of human experience, in all its pain, frustration, frenzy, stillness, and joy. Throughout the conversation you'll hear Julian play along to accompany his points; he also graciously provided beautiful meditative interludes, much like the kind you'd experience in one of his "Notes of Rest" sessions. Interview by Matt Croasmun.

This episode was made possible in part by the generous support of the Tyndale House Foundation. For more information, visit tyndale.foundation.

Show Notes

  • Click here to learn more about Julian Reid's "Notes of Rest"
  • Introduction: Evan Rosa
  • "God has given us music so that above all it can lead us upwards. Music unites all qualities: it can exalt us, divert us, cheer us up, or break the hardest of hearts with the softest of its melancholy tones. But its principal task is to lead our thoughts to higher things, to elevate, even to make us tremble… The musical art often speaks in sounds more penetrating than the words of poetry, and takes hold of the most hidden crevices of the heart… Song elevates our being and leads us to the good and the true. If, however, music serves only as a diversion or as a kind of vain ostentation it is sinful and harmful." (Friedrich Nietzsche at 14 years old; see Friedrich Nietzsche: A Philosophical Biography by Julian Young; h/t Brain Pickings)
  • Bringing together music and scripture
  • Engendering wonder and trust as a seedbed for a life of faith
  • Creating space, the architecture that music creates
  • Weekly liturgical practices
  • The ends and uses of music in sacred spaces
  • Living in a tent, motel—a musical spiritual hotel
  • Scripture is like a cathedral or museum.
  • Performance: "Thank You, Lord"
  • Gratitude—the way we enter into hospitality, "what it means to be hosted by God"
  • Hotel art—the artwork invites and calms rather than jarring and provoking
  • Curiosity vs calmness
  • Invoking a different kind of response
  • Sanitizing the Psalms
  • Performance: "Give Me Jesus"
  • Speaking to different registers
  • Aimed at an encounter with the living God
  • Grace
  • Proclamation: music and preaching
  • Taking risks over the pulpit
  • Karl Barth: "God tempts the church through God's absence."
  • Kerygma: "proclamation"
  • Performance: "Lord, Hear My Prayer" (Taize)
  • Word and Water
  • The metaphor of water utilized in "Notes of Rest"
  • Black musical idioms
  • Finding the use of Contemporary Christian Music (CCM)
  • Balm in Gilead
  • The Hymns of Isaac Watts, colonizing, historical context
  • Combining musical genealogies
  • Braxton Shelly's Healing for the Soul
  • Imaginative fuel from the mystics
  • Cistercian monastics: worshipping in silence and solitude; "a long-standing faith"
  • Performance: "Lord, Hear My Prayer / Give Me Jesus" (Medley)

Introduction (Evan Rosa)

One of the most gripping and influential philosophers of the last 200 years once wrote:

"God has given us music so that above all it can lead us upwards. Music unites all qualities: it can exalt us, divert us, cheer us up, or break the hardest of hearts with the softest of its melancholy tones. But its principal task is to lead our thoughts to higher things, to elevate, even to make us tremble… The musical art often speaks in sounds more penetrating than the words of poetry, and takes hold of the most hidden crevices of the heart… Song elevates our being and leads us to the good and the true. If, however, music serves only as a diversion or as a kind of vain ostentation it is sinful and harmful."

That Friedrich Nietzsche, written when he was 14 years old.

There is plenty of "vain ostentation" in popular music today, and certainly not excluding the music played in church.

But the unitive depth and invitation into transcendence that music offers us of course pairs beautifully with scripture. And whatever else might have changed in Nietzsche's thinking, even at the end of his life in Twilight of the Idols, he suggested that "Without music life would be a mistake. The German imagines even God as a songster." And I say: Well, not just the German, but the human.

In today's episode, Matt Croasmun welcomes Julian Reid, jazz pianist and producer, writer, and performer (not to mention Yale and Emory educated). You can hear his hip-hop infused jazz project The JuJu Exchange on episode 26 of For the Life of the World, when Julian joined us to talk about How Jazz Teaches us Faith and Justice. Today, Matt and Julian explore the way music and scripture can come together to create a sacred space. Extending metaphors of music as architecture and dwelling and spiritual experience as a river, Julian explains a recent project of his, "Notes of Rest," combining African-American spirituals with classical hymns for an experience of spiritual hospitality, gratitude, and proclamation of the Gospel into the full spectrum of human experience, in all its pain, frustration, frenzy, stillness, and joy.

Throughout the conversation you'll hear Julian play along to accompany his points; he also graciously provided beautiful meditative interludes, much like the kind you'd experience in one of his "Notes of Rest" sessions.

Thanks for listening.

About Julian Reid

Julian Reid is a Chicago-based jazz pianist and producer, writer, and performer (B.A. Yale University / M.Div. Emory University). The JuJu Exchange is a musical partnership also featuring Nico Segal (trumpet, Chance the Rapper; The Social Experiment) and Everett Reid—exploring creativity, justice, and the human experience through their hip-hop infused jazz. Their new 5-song project is called The Eternal Boombox. Julian's latest project is "Notes of Rest"—a spiritual mini-retreat that places meditations from the Bible on a bed of music, cultivating rest, contemplation, and creativity in all who will hear Jesus’ call.

Production Notes

  • This podcast featured musician Julian Reid and biblical scholar Matt Croasmun
  • Edited and Produced by Evan Rosa
  • Hosted by Evan Rosa
  • Production Assistance by Martin Chan, Nathan Jowers, Natalie Lam, and Logan Ledman
  • A Production of the Yale Center for Faith & Culture at Yale Divinity School https://faith.yale.edu/about
  • Support For the Life of the World podcast by giving to the Yale Center for Faith & Culture: https://faith.yale.edu/give
Julian Reid
Julian Reid
Matthew Croasmun
Associate Research Scholar

Julian Reid explores the way music and scripture can come together to create a sacred space, extending metaphors of music as architecture and dwelling and spiritual experience as a river. He combines African-American spirituals with classical hymns to foster hospitality, gratitude, and proclamation of the Gospel into the full spectrum of human experience, in all its pain, frustration, frenzy, stillness, and joy.

Julian Reid explores the way music and scripture can come together to create a sacred space. Extending metaphors of music as architecture and dwelling and spiritual experience as a river, the jazz pianist, producer, writer, and performer explains a recent project of his, "Notes of Rest," combining African-American spirituals with classical hymns for an experience of spiritual hospitality, gratitude, and proclamation of the Gospel into the full spectrum of human experience, in all its pain, frustration, frenzy, stillness, and joy. Throughout the conversation you'll hear Julian play along to accompany his points; he also graciously provided beautiful meditative interludes, much like the kind you'd experience in one of his "Notes of Rest" sessions. Interview by Matt Croasmun.

This episode was made possible in part by the generous support of the Tyndale House Foundation. For more information, visit tyndale.foundation.

Show Notes

  • Click here to learn more about Julian Reid's "Notes of Rest"
  • Introduction: Evan Rosa
  • "God has given us music so that above all it can lead us upwards. Music unites all qualities: it can exalt us, divert us, cheer us up, or break the hardest of hearts with the softest of its melancholy tones. But its principal task is to lead our thoughts to higher things, to elevate, even to make us tremble… The musical art often speaks in sounds more penetrating than the words of poetry, and takes hold of the most hidden crevices of the heart… Song elevates our being and leads us to the good and the true. If, however, music serves only as a diversion or as a kind of vain ostentation it is sinful and harmful." (Friedrich Nietzsche at 14 years old; see Friedrich Nietzsche: A Philosophical Biography by Julian Young; h/t Brain Pickings)
  • Bringing together music and scripture
  • Engendering wonder and trust as a seedbed for a life of faith
  • Creating space, the architecture that music creates
  • Weekly liturgical practices
  • The ends and uses of music in sacred spaces
  • Living in a tent, motel—a musical spiritual hotel
  • Scripture is like a cathedral or museum.
  • Performance: "Thank You, Lord"
  • Gratitude—the way we enter into hospitality, "what it means to be hosted by God"
  • Hotel art—the artwork invites and calms rather than jarring and provoking
  • Curiosity vs calmness
  • Invoking a different kind of response
  • Sanitizing the Psalms
  • Performance: "Give Me Jesus"
  • Speaking to different registers
  • Aimed at an encounter with the living God
  • Grace
  • Proclamation: music and preaching
  • Taking risks over the pulpit
  • Karl Barth: "God tempts the church through God's absence."
  • Kerygma: "proclamation"
  • Performance: "Lord, Hear My Prayer" (Taize)
  • Word and Water
  • The metaphor of water utilized in "Notes of Rest"
  • Black musical idioms
  • Finding the use of Contemporary Christian Music (CCM)
  • Balm in Gilead
  • The Hymns of Isaac Watts, colonizing, historical context
  • Combining musical genealogies
  • Braxton Shelly's Healing for the Soul
  • Imaginative fuel from the mystics
  • Cistercian monastics: worshipping in silence and solitude; "a long-standing faith"
  • Performance: "Lord, Hear My Prayer / Give Me Jesus" (Medley)

Introduction (Evan Rosa)

One of the most gripping and influential philosophers of the last 200 years once wrote:

"God has given us music so that above all it can lead us upwards. Music unites all qualities: it can exalt us, divert us, cheer us up, or break the hardest of hearts with the softest of its melancholy tones. But its principal task is to lead our thoughts to higher things, to elevate, even to make us tremble… The musical art often speaks in sounds more penetrating than the words of poetry, and takes hold of the most hidden crevices of the heart… Song elevates our being and leads us to the good and the true. If, however, music serves only as a diversion or as a kind of vain ostentation it is sinful and harmful."

That Friedrich Nietzsche, written when he was 14 years old.

There is plenty of "vain ostentation" in popular music today, and certainly not excluding the music played in church.

But the unitive depth and invitation into transcendence that music offers us of course pairs beautifully with scripture. And whatever else might have changed in Nietzsche's thinking, even at the end of his life in Twilight of the Idols, he suggested that "Without music life would be a mistake. The German imagines even God as a songster." And I say: Well, not just the German, but the human.

In today's episode, Matt Croasmun welcomes Julian Reid, jazz pianist and producer, writer, and performer (not to mention Yale and Emory educated). You can hear his hip-hop infused jazz project The JuJu Exchange on episode 26 of For the Life of the World, when Julian joined us to talk about How Jazz Teaches us Faith and Justice. Today, Matt and Julian explore the way music and scripture can come together to create a sacred space. Extending metaphors of music as architecture and dwelling and spiritual experience as a river, Julian explains a recent project of his, "Notes of Rest," combining African-American spirituals with classical hymns for an experience of spiritual hospitality, gratitude, and proclamation of the Gospel into the full spectrum of human experience, in all its pain, frustration, frenzy, stillness, and joy.

Throughout the conversation you'll hear Julian play along to accompany his points; he also graciously provided beautiful meditative interludes, much like the kind you'd experience in one of his "Notes of Rest" sessions.

Thanks for listening.

About Julian Reid

Julian Reid is a Chicago-based jazz pianist and producer, writer, and performer (B.A. Yale University / M.Div. Emory University). The JuJu Exchange is a musical partnership also featuring Nico Segal (trumpet, Chance the Rapper; The Social Experiment) and Everett Reid—exploring creativity, justice, and the human experience through their hip-hop infused jazz. Their new 5-song project is called The Eternal Boombox. Julian's latest project is "Notes of Rest"—a spiritual mini-retreat that places meditations from the Bible on a bed of music, cultivating rest, contemplation, and creativity in all who will hear Jesus’ call.

Production Notes

  • This podcast featured musician Julian Reid and biblical scholar Matt Croasmun
  • Edited and Produced by Evan Rosa
  • Hosted by Evan Rosa
  • Production Assistance by Martin Chan, Nathan Jowers, Natalie Lam, and Logan Ledman
  • A Production of the Yale Center for Faith & Culture at Yale Divinity School https://faith.yale.edu/about
  • Support For the Life of the World podcast by giving to the Yale Center for Faith & Culture: https://faith.yale.edu/give

Julian Reid
Julian Reid
Matthew Croasmun
Associate Research Scholar

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